Kate Grenville interview: why perfumes are making you sick | The Guardian

Unfortunately, even natural fragrances from essential oils can be just as potent! Why we don’t use fragrances for fragrance’s sake and why we’re very, very careful even when it comes to essential oils –

The most startling thing in the beginning was that far from being the only one affected, one in three [Americans] report health problems that can be traced back to fragrance. Many people get headaches like I do, but other people know their asthma is triggered by it, [or have] other respiratory problems – like their throat closes up or they start coughing or sneezing – or they feel sick to the stomach when they smell fragrance.

The next surprise was to find modern perfumes are mostly not made from flowers. Virtually all fragrances – whether very expensive in little tiny bottles, or the stuff you put in the toilet to make it smell nice – they are all made from chemicals.

The surprise after that was that fragrance manufacturers don’t have to declare all their ingredients, so on the one hand they can make stuff cheaply from synthetics, and on the other they don’t have to tell us. The cocktail that makes up a fragrance is considered a “trade secret”, and that’s why they are exempt from the labelling laws.

Source: Kate Grenville interview: why perfumes are making you sick | Books | The Guardian

Is your perfume making you sick? New study suggests so | Daily Mail Online

Is your perfume making you sick? New study suggests so | Daily Mail Online

Why we don’t add fragrance for fragrance’s sake! –

New research from the University of Melbourne has found that one in three Australians have reported adverse health effects from fragranced products.

These effects include anything from breathing problems to migraine headaches, skin irritation and even asthma attacks. But fragranced products don’t just encompass perfumes and body sprays. Hand soaps, surface sprays, household cleaners and laundry liquids and scented candles could all also cause disabling effects.

‘This is an epidemic. Fragranced products are creating health problems across Australia,’ the lead author, Professor Anne Steinemann, said.

Source: Is your perfume making you sick? New study suggests so | Daily Mail Online

How to Introduce Peanut-Containing Foods to Your Infant to Avoid Allergy | US News

How to Introduce Peanut-Containing Foods to Your Infant to Avoid Allergy | US News

Hope for avoiding peanut allergies! –

New guidelines released Thursday by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recommend peanut-containing foods be introduced as early as 4 to 6 months of life.

The new recommendation is based on three recent studies examining the best time to introduce peanut-containing foods to prevent peanut allergy. The most convincing of these studies was the Learning Early About Peanut (LEAP) trial from England. In it, infants with moderate-to-severe eczema (a type of skin rash) and/or egg allergy were randomly introduced to peanut-containing foods between 4 to 11 months, or told to deliberately avoid peanut-containing foods until age 5.

Those who ate peanut-containing foods in the first year of life had an 80 percent lower risk of developing peanut allergy. This study showed early peanut introduction is very safe (most reactions that occurred were mild) and there were no negative effects on growth. Children fed peanut-containing foods early breast-fed as long as those who had delayed introduction.

Source: How to Introduce Peanut-Containing Foods to Your Infant to Avoid Allergy | For Better | US News

Give peanut-based foods to babies early to prevent allergies, new guidelines say – LA Times

Important new advice on allergies! –

Most babies should start eating peanut-containing foods well before their first birthday, say guidelines released Thursday that aim to protect high-risk tots and other youngsters, too, from developing the dangerous allergy to peanuts.

The new guidelines from the National Institutes of Health mark a shift in dietary advice, based on landmark research that found early exposure dramatically lowers a baby’s chances of becoming allergic. The recommendations spell out exactly how to introduce infants to peanut-based foods and when — for some, as early as 4 to 6 months of age — depending on whether they’re at high, moderate or low risk of developing one of the most troublesome food allergies.

Source: Give peanut-based foods to babies early to prevent allergies, new guidelines say – LA Times

Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use | Fox News

Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use | Fox News

The link between gut health and allergies is becoming clearer and clearer. Why making sure babies are exposed to the right environmental influences – and not the wrong ones – is so important! –

LONDON –  Babies given antibiotics in the first two years of life are more likely to develop allergies as adults, according to an extensive analysis of past clinical studies involving nearly 400,000 people.

The findings, to be presented on Tuesday at the European Respiratory Society annual meeting in London, point to a clear association with the risk of eczema or hay fever later in life.Some previous research has suggested a link between early antibiotic use and allergies, but the results have been inconsistent.

Lead researcher Fariba Ahmadizar of Utrecht University said antibiotics most likely disrupted the body’s immune system by impacting microbes in the gut, which can negatively affect immune responses.

Source: Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use | Fox News