Infant sleep research: No need to make babies cry 

Infant sleep research: No need to make babies cry 

There are as many techniques as there are mums! Just as long as it works for you and your little one –

New mothers often use controlled crying to help get their baby to sleep but new research, which looked at 34 subjects, found that responsive settling could be a less stressful option.The research, published in the Journal of Early Human Development, shows that responsive settling reduces the salivary cortisol levels or stress levels in babies and mothers.

Source: Infant sleep research: No need to make babies cry – Drive – ABC Radio

Simple breath test during pregnancy could prevent asthma in babies – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Simple breath test during pregnancy could prevent asthma in babies – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Amazing! –

The breath test measured levels of nitric oxide, a marker of lung inflammation. In the study, half the participants were prescribed medication doses based on how the women assessed their own symptoms.

The other half kept track of how they felt, but they were also assessed more precisely using the breath test. Scientists do not know exactly why, but by tweaking the mother’s medication according to the breath test findings, they halved the incidence of asthma in the babies.

Source: Simple breath test during pregnancy could prevent asthma in babies – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Babies Can Recognize Faces Before They’re Even Born, Researchers Find 

Why interacting with your baby before he or she arrives isn’t as silly as it seems! –

The study, by a team from Lancaster University in the UK, discovered that unborn babies turned their heads towards shapes that resemble faces. But when the same infants were shown a random shape, they ignored it.

The findings suggest that the instinct to recognize facial features develops before a baby has even seen its first face.

Researchers also believe the results indicate that a baby’s senses are already well developed before it is born, and suggest parents begin interacting with their baby while he or she is still in the womb.

Source: Babies Can Recognize Faces Before They’re Even Born, Researchers Find 

Too Clean for Our Children’s Good? – The New York Times

Too Clean for Our Children’s Good? – The New York Times

Yet another reason to move to the country! –

Many parents, quite reasonably, worry about germs and dirt finding their way into a child’s mouth. But many have also heard in recent years of the “hygiene hypothesis,” which holds that some exposure to germs and microorganisms in early childhood is actually good for us because it helps develop the immune system. A 2013 Swedish study, for example, showed that children whose parents just sucked their pacifiers clean had a lower risk of developing eczema.

When we talk about the hygiene hypothesis, the collection of theories that address the possible problems that can be associated with growing up less exposed to germs and dirt, we are essentially talking about growing up indoors. We’re talking about living in a world of relatively clean and controlled surfaces, where even small children who are constantly picking things up and putting them in their mouths are not going to come into contact with a very wide variety of exposures.

“The built environment is the place in which our children grow up,” said Jack Gilbert, the director of the Microbiome Center and a professor of surgery at the University of Chicago. He was one of the authors of a well-known 2016 study in The New England Journal of Medicine which compared the immune profiles of Amish children, growing up on small single-family farms, and Hutterite children, who are similar genetically but grow up on large, industrialized farms. The Amish, living in an environment described as “rich in microbes,” or alternatively, full of barnyard dust, had strikingly low rates of asthma.

Source: Too Clean for Our Children’s Good? – The New York Times

Cranky Baby? Feeding May Not Be the Right Answer – The New York Times

In either case, responding to a crying baby (even if it’s not with food) is key! –

Feeding a hungry baby can seem like one of the most basic tasks of parenthood, but right from the beginning, the way an individual baby eats, gains weight and grows is a complicated parent-child mix of behavior and biology.

Part of the equation is whether the baby is actually hungry, or whether parents are providing food at any sign of distress. Dr. Ian Paul, a professor of pediatrics and public health sciences at Penn State College of Medicine, is one of the leaders of the Insight Study, an intervention which started in 2011 to look at the effects of helping parents learn “responsive parenting” strategies that help them read their babies’ signals.

Source: Cranky Baby? Feeding May Not Be the Right Answer – The New York Times