The Unwanted Ingredient in Canned Soup | Rodale News

More research that highlights the concerns surrounding BPA -

Chinese researchers have just given you one more reason to ditch canned soup for good: A controversial chemical used in canned-good linings, as well as in certain types of plastics and the coatings for cash-register receipts, has been associated with higher rates of brain cancer.

The study, published in the International Journal of Clinical Oncology, compared levels of bisphenol A (BPA) to rates of meningioma, a type of cancer that grows in the membrane that surrounds your brain and spinal cord, in about 500 adults who were being treated at a clinic in China. About half of those people had been diagnosed with meningioma, while the other half had not.

The researchers found that the adults with higher levels of BPA in their urine were more likely to have that particular form of brain cancer than those whose levels were lower. The people with the highest concentrations of BPA were 1.4 to 1.6 times more likely to have the cancer than people with the lowest levels. That was even after the researchers controlled for things like weight, family history, and whether the person had been on hormone replacement therapy.

BPA is a hormone disruptor, meaning that it interferes with the way your body produces and regulates estrogen, testosterone, and other hormones, such as insulin, which is why past studies have linked it to breast and prostate cancers and to metabolic diseases like diabetes. Meningioma is a hormonal cancer influenced by high levels of female hormones, which is one reason the cancer is more often seen in women.

Although this study doesn’t show that BPA causes meningioma, it does add to a growing body of research linking the chemical to serious health issues. In addition to those listed above, BPA has been linked to heart disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Click The New Scary Threat in Canned Soup | Rodale News to read the full article.

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