19 Ways to Allergy-Proof Your Home

19 Ways to Allergy-Proof Your Home

Good advice on keeping your home allergen-free! –

Pay special attention to bedrooms

You spend more time in your bedroom than in any other room in your house. Unfortunately, in many cases, this room is the most polluted and inviting for allergens like mold, pollen, animal dander, dust mites, and cockroaches. So clear out knickknacks and clutter, remove drapes, and avoid storing things under your bed. Also, keep your bed away from air vents, if you can, so you don’t breathe in dust that comes out of them as you sleep.Get bedding and pillows you can machine-wash, and avoid down pillows and comforters, which can’t be washed easily.In kids’ bedrooms, keep stuffed animals to a minimum—they are dust traps. If your kids can’t part with them, wash stuffed toys every so often to remove the dust. Use a damp cloth to wipe those that can’t be machine-washed, and dry them on your dryer’s hottest setting to kill dust mites.

Source: 19 Ways to Allergy-Proof Your Home

Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age? – The New York Times

Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age? – The New York Times

It feels like allergies are becoming more and more common, and developing  allergies as an adult can be much more challenging! –

Yes. Preliminary data from a large, new national study that is currently under review suggests that nearly 52 percent of American adults with a reported food allergy developed one or more food allergies after age 18. An estimated 5 percent of adults in the United States have a food allergy, compared with about 8 percent of children. And while some children outgrow allergies — usually those to milk, eggs and wheat — many retain their allergies through adulthood.

Source: Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age? – The New York Times

Thumb Suckers and Nail Biters May Develop Fewer Allergies – The New York Times

Thumb Suckers and Nail Biters May Develop Fewer Allergies – The New York Times

Why thumb sucking might be a good thing! –

A new study suggests that those habits in children ages 5 to 11 may indeed increase exposure to microbes, but that that may not be all bad. In a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, researchers drew evidence from an ongoing study of New Zealand children to show those whose parents described them as thumb-suckers and nail-biters were less likely to have positive allergic skin tests later in life.

Source: Thumb Suckers and Nail Biters May Develop Fewer Allergies – The New York Times

Feeding Infants Peanut Products Could Prevent Allergies, Study Suggests – The New York Times

Feeding Infants Peanut Products Could Prevent Allergies, Study Suggests – The New York Times

Advice that turns common wisdom on its head! Important new research which suggests we might be doing a complete about-turn on how to prevent peanut allergies –

Turning what was once conventional wisdom on its head, a new study suggests that many, if not most peanut allergies can be prevented by feeding young children food containing peanuts beginning in infancy, rather than avoiding such foods.About 2 percent of American children are allergic to peanuts, a figure that has more than quadrupled since 1997 for reasons that are not entirely clear. There have also been big increases in other Western countries. For some people, even traces of peanuts can be life-threatening.An editorial published Monday in The New England Journal of Medicine, along with the study, called the results “so compelling” and the rise of peanut allergies “so alarming” that guidelines for how to feed infants at risk of peanut allergies should be revised soon.

Source: Feeding Infants Peanut Products Could Prevent Allergies, Study Suggests – The New York Times

Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age? – The New York Times

Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age? – The New York Times

It’s certainly becoming more common! –

Preliminary data from a large, new national study that is currently under review suggests that nearly 52 percent of American adults with a reported food allergy developed one or more food allergies after age 18. Many adults who develop a new food allergy wonder what caused it — the “turn-on switch” as Dr. Gupta calls it. Anecdotal reports suggest that pregnancy, for example, can trigger new allergies, leading some to hypothesize that a hormonal connection may be at play. Other patients report they noticed a new allergy after getting a viral infection. Still, it is not yet clear what causes a new reaction to a food after someone has eaten it for decades without incident.

Source: Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age? – The New York Times