19 Ways to Allergy-Proof Your Home

19 Ways to Allergy-Proof Your Home

Good advice on keeping your home allergen-free! –

Pay special attention to bedrooms

You spend more time in your bedroom than in any other room in your house. Unfortunately, in many cases, this room is the most polluted and inviting for allergens like mold, pollen, animal dander, dust mites, and cockroaches. So clear out knickknacks and clutter, remove drapes, and avoid storing things under your bed. Also, keep your bed away from air vents, if you can, so you don’t breathe in dust that comes out of them as you sleep.Get bedding and pillows you can machine-wash, and avoid down pillows and comforters, which can’t be washed easily.In kids’ bedrooms, keep stuffed animals to a minimum—they are dust traps. If your kids can’t part with them, wash stuffed toys every so often to remove the dust. Use a damp cloth to wipe those that can’t be machine-washed, and dry them on your dryer’s hottest setting to kill dust mites.

Source: 19 Ways to Allergy-Proof Your Home

How to Introduce Peanut-Containing Foods to Your Infant to Avoid Allergy | US News

How to Introduce Peanut-Containing Foods to Your Infant to Avoid Allergy | US News

Hope for avoiding peanut allergies! –

New guidelines released Thursday by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recommend peanut-containing foods be introduced as early as 4 to 6 months of life.

The new recommendation is based on three recent studies examining the best time to introduce peanut-containing foods to prevent peanut allergy. The most convincing of these studies was the Learning Early About Peanut (LEAP) trial from England. In it, infants with moderate-to-severe eczema (a type of skin rash) and/or egg allergy were randomly introduced to peanut-containing foods between 4 to 11 months, or told to deliberately avoid peanut-containing foods until age 5.

Those who ate peanut-containing foods in the first year of life had an 80 percent lower risk of developing peanut allergy. This study showed early peanut introduction is very safe (most reactions that occurred were mild) and there were no negative effects on growth. Children fed peanut-containing foods early breast-fed as long as those who had delayed introduction.

Source: How to Introduce Peanut-Containing Foods to Your Infant to Avoid Allergy | For Better | US News

Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use | Fox News

Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use | Fox News

The link between gut health and allergies is becoming clearer and clearer. Why making sure babies are exposed to the right environmental influences – and not the wrong ones – is so important! –

LONDON –  Babies given antibiotics in the first two years of life are more likely to develop allergies as adults, according to an extensive analysis of past clinical studies involving nearly 400,000 people.

The findings, to be presented on Tuesday at the European Respiratory Society annual meeting in London, point to a clear association with the risk of eczema or hay fever later in life.Some previous research has suggested a link between early antibiotic use and allergies, but the results have been inconsistent.

Lead researcher Fariba Ahmadizar of Utrecht University said antibiotics most likely disrupted the body’s immune system by impacting microbes in the gut, which can negatively affect immune responses.

Source: Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use | Fox News

Study Sees Link Between Allergies and the Infant Gut – WSJ

Study Sees Link Between Allergies and the Infant Gut – WSJ

You are what you eat, quite literally, from birth! Why babies need natural exposure to their environment and keeping that as close to the real thing as possible is the best thing for them –

Researchers have found a connection between the hundreds of microbe species in a baby’s gut and allergy risk. Variations in just four kinds of bacteria—Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium, and Akkermansi—heightened the risk of allergies and asthma, researchers led by Dr. Lynch at UCSF and her colleagues at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit reported in September in Nature Medicine. They tracked 298 children from birth through early childhood and documented the relationship between the fledgling microbiome and chronic ailments.

Infants with the lowest levels of critical gut bacteria at the age of one month—who were mostly boys—were more likely to be allergy-prone by their second birthday. They were more likely to show signs of asthma by the time they reached the age of 4 years, the researchers said.

Source: Study Sees Link Between Allergies and the Infant Gut – WSJ

Vitamin B levels during pregnancy linked to eczema risk in child | University of Southampton

Vitamin B levels during pregnancy linked to eczema risk in child | University of Southampton

We love mushrooms and nuts, but here’s even more reason to have them, especially if you’re expecting a little one! –

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown.

The study from the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, is the first to link maternal serum levels of nicotinamide, a naturally occurring vitamin, and related metabolites to the risk of atopic eczema in the child.The researchers believe the findings support the concept that eczema partly originates as a baby develops in the womb and could reveal ways of reducing the risk of the skin condition.

Nicotinamide is a form of vitamin B3. Its level is maintained through intake of foods such as fish, meat, chicken, mushrooms, nuts and coffee as well as tryptophan, an amino acid found in most proteins. Nicotinamide and related nutrients are important for the body’s immune responses and energy metabolism.

Source: Vitamin B levels during pregnancy linked to eczema risk in child | University of Southampton