10 toxic chemicals to avoid in eye makeup | Fox News

10 toxic chemicals to avoid in eye makeup | Fox News

A helpful guide! It takes a little time to do your research but paying attention to what you put on your (and your little one’s) skin is just as important as paying attention to what goes into your bodies! –

Makeup is supposed to make you look even more beautiful, but that beauty comes at a cost when you consider the toxic chemicals that are lurking in most brands of eye shadows, liners, mascaras, makeup brushes, eyelash curlers and false-lash adhesives.

Experts say using these chemicals can lead to red, scaly eyelids, blood-shot eyes, dry eye disease, and serious long-term health conditions. What’s more, although more than 1,300 chemicals are banned from cosmetics in Europe, only 11 are in the U.S.

Here are for 10 chemicals to avoid and ways you can find better alternatives.

1. Carbon black

Carbon black is a powder found in eyeliner, mascara, eye shadow and eyebrow shadow and has been linked to cancer and organ system toxicity.It will show up on the label as carbon black, D & C Black No. 2, acetylene black, channel black, furnace black, lamp black and thermal black.

2. Ethanolamine compounds

“The problem with ethanolamines is that they can be contaminated with cancer-causing chemicals called nitrosamines,” said Janet Nudelman, director of program and policy at the Breast Cancer Fund and director of the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics.To spot ethanolamines, avoid products that contain ingredients with the letters DEA, TEA and MEA.

3. BAK

Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is a preservative found in eyeliner, mascara and makeup remover.  BAK is well documented to be toxic to the epithelial cells of the eyes. These cells keep dust, water and bacteria out of the eye and provide a smooth surface on the cornea to absorb and distribute oxygen and cell nutrients from tears to the rest of the cornea. BAK can be listed under various names including benzalkonium chloride, quaternium-15 or guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride.

4. Prime yellow carnauba wax

Used in mascara and eyeliners to stiffen the product and make them waterproof, prime yellow carnauba wax clogs the oil glands in the eyes and can lead to dry eye disease, which affects 3.2 million women age 50 and older, according to the National Institutes of Health. Using products that contain waxes isn’t a good idea, although Japan wax might be a safer alternative, said Dr. Leslie E. O’Dell, director of the Dry Eye Center of Pennsylvania in Mechanicsburg and Manchester.

5. Formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing preservatives

Formaldehyde and preservatives that release the chemical are strongly linked to allergic reactions and cancer. Formaldehyde can be listed as such on the label but it might also be listed as quaternium-15, DMDM hydantoin and urea.

6. Parabens

Parabens are preservatives that are used to prevent the growth of bacteria in makeup products, but they’re absorbed through the skin and easily transmitted into the bloodstream. They’re also endocrine disruptors and are linked to reproductive toxicity, early puberty and breast cancer. Parabens can also make dry eye worse since they prohibit the oil glands that line the eyelid from secreting enough oil, O’Dell said. When reading labels, avoid anything with the suffix-paraben.

Source: 10 toxic chemicals to avoid in eye makeup | Fox News

Potentially Toxic Chemicals Plummet In Teens After Switching To Safer Cosmetics | Healthy Child Healthy World

Potentially Toxic Chemicals Plummet In Teens After Switching To Safer Cosmetics | Healthy Child Healthy World

Why being aware of what goes into the products we bring into our homes really makes a difference! –

The levels of potentially hormone-disrupting chemicals in the bodies of teenage girls plunged just three days after they stopped using certain cosmetic products, shampoos and soaps that contained the problematic substances, according to a new study by researchers with the University of California – Berkeley.

The researchers selected safer products using EWG’s Skin Deep database.The volunteers, 100 Latina girls between 14 and 18 years old, all from Salinas, Calif., pledged to refrain from using their regular personal care products for three days and instead to rely solely on products free of the suspected endocrine disruptors phthalates, parabens and triclosan.

After three days, the teens’ urine tests showed these decreases in the concentrations of the cosmetics ingredients under study: 44 percent down in levels of methyl and propyl paraben. Parabens are preservatives widely used in cosmetics, shampoos and skin lotions. 35 percent down in triclosan, an antibacterial chemical common in liquid antibacterial hand soap, dishwashing detergent, toothpaste, face wash and deodorant. Triclosan has been linked to the disruption of thyroid and reproductive hormones. 27 percent down in mono-ethyl phthalates. Phthalates, common industrial plasticizers, show up in some nail polish and fragrances.

Source: Potentially Toxic Chemicals Plummet In Teens After Switching To Safer Cosmetics | Healthy Child Healthy World

3 Everyday Chemical Exposures Pregnant Women Should Avoid | Rodale News

Why knowing what goes into your skincare matters! Especially when you have a little one on the way –

Antibacterial Chemicals

The newest threat for mothers isn’t something dirty, it’s something quite “clean.” The evidence is mounting that pregnant women and their unborn babies are being exposed to antibacterial compounds with serious health risks, according to research presented at the American Chemical Society.

“We looked at the exposure of pregnant women and their fetuses to triclosan and triclocarban, two of the most commonly used germ-killers in soaps and other everyday products,” says Benny Pycke, PhD. “We found triclosan in all of the urine samples from the pregnant women that we screened. We also detected it in about half of the umbilical cord blood samples we took, which means it transfers to fetuses. Triclocarban was also in many of the samples.”

Animal studies have demonstrated that these antibacterial chemicals can lead to developmental and reproductive problems, and new research has found a correlation between human mother exposures and shorter babies. These chemicals are often found in soaps and toothpaste. One state is taking action to protect children: In May, Minnesota voted to ban the use of triclosan in most consumer products. That ban goes into effect in 2017.

Beauty Product Chemicals

“The skin can absorb as much as 60 percent of what we put on it,” says Silverstone. So it’s important to know what you’re exposing yourself to. Three culprit beauty chemical types are parabens, phthalates, and retinols.

Parabens: “These are the most popular synthetic preservatives in products like shampoo, makeup, lotions, scrubs, and deodorants and are estimated to be in 75 to 90 percent of products,” says Silverstone. They’re to be avoided because, like BPA, parabens mimic estrogen.

Phthalates: If your product has a scent, it probably has phthalates. “They’re a class of chemicals that include suspected carcinogens and known hormone disruptors and that can interfere with fetal development,” explains Silverstone. They’re especially dangerous for moms of boys, as phthalates have been linked to genitalia development disorders and autism.

Retinols: Commonly found in wrinkle creams, retinols have been linked to facial abnormalities, heart defects, nervous system abnormalities, and cleft lips. “Though Retin-A is the only topical form that’s been linked to severe berth defects, it’s certainly better to be safe than sorry when it comes to your beauty regimen.”

Click 3 Everyday Chemical Exposures Pregnant Women Should Avoid | Rodale News to read the full article.

Stricter EU rules on parabens? | ScienceNordic

Stricter EU rules on parabens? | ScienceNordic

Hopefully the EU will do something to take the lead on parabens, but some countries and companies have started the ball rolling, so that’s a start! –

Senior Researcher Torkjel M. Sandanger and a group of NILU researchers at the Fram Centre in Tromsø have analysed 350 blood samples from Norwegian women, and have found a very clear link between the women’s self-reported use of cosmetic products and the level of parabens in their blood.

Among heavy users, the level of parabens in the blood was actually higher than levels of all other potential environmental pollutants surveyed.

“This gives grounds for concern, because parabens are chemical substances which can disrupt the hormonal balance in the body. Studies have shown that substances of this kind which cause hormonal imbalance can have an adverse impact on fertility in both women and men. They can also lead to certain types of cancer if used over a long period of time,” says Sandanger.

“There is a pressing need for more studies to be done on the effects these substances have on the population”.

Ban in Denmark

Parabens are a class of chemicals used as preservatives in a large number of cosmetic products.

Parabens have been met with increasing scepticism and concern in the past few years. Many cosmetic products also contain other chemical substances which have unknown or harmful effects.

In Denmark, this growing concern caused the government to introduce a ban on 15 March 2011 against the use of propyl- and butylparabens in cosmetic products aimed at children under three years old.

The EU’s Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) had previously taken the view that parabens did not pose a health risk, but the Danish ban triggered a new assessment which led to the SCCS in November 2011 recommending a ban on parabens in products aimed at children under six months old.

Click Stricter EU rules on parabens | ScienceNordic to read the full article.

Stricter EU rules on parabens | ScienceNordic

We do hope this happens! Parabens have come under more and more scrutiny, but they’re unfortunately still used in a vast number of personal care products, even those on babies, yikes! –

Parabens are a class of chemicals used as preservatives in a large number of cosmetic products.

Parabens have been met with increasing scepticism and concern in the past few years. Many cosmetic products also contain other chemical substances which have unknown or harmful effects.

In Denmark, this growing concern caused the government to introduce a ban on 15 March 2011 against the use of propyl- and butylparabens in cosmetic products aimed at children under three years old.

The EU’s Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) had previously taken the view that parabens did not pose a health risk, but the Danish ban triggered a new assessment which led to the SCCS in November 2011 recommending a ban on parabens in products aimed at children under six months old.

The European Commission, which is the executive organ of the EU, has since followed up the scientific recommendations and is in the process of implementing an entire EU-wide ban. The Commission also wishes to reduce the maximum permissible level of propyl- and butylparabens in all types of cosmetic products.

The Norwegian Food Safety Authority follows the EU in such cases, which means that the stricter regulation will also apply in Norway.

Click Stricter EU rules on parabens | ScienceNordic to read the full article.