Chemicals in cosmetics – are they safe?

A great guide to getting started on getting to know what we apply on our skins! –

Recently the issue hit the headlines when Johnson & Johnson was ordered by the courts in the US to pay $US72 million to the family of a woman who used its baby powder and died of the cancer.

We take a closer look at some of the chemicals ringing alarm bells to see which claims are justified, which aren’t and which ones need more research.

Phthalates

Phthalates are used as plasticisers and solvents, and can be found in fragrances, hair products, skin lotions, nail polish and nail hardeners. They have been found to have endocrine disruption effects, and have been linked with endometriosis and early puberty in girls, and reproductive organ abnormalities and reduced fertility in males. They can also act on the thyroid, and have been linked with obesity.In light of these concerns, several phthalates have been banned for use in cosmetics in Australia: dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diisobutylphthalate and di(methyloxyhexyl)phthalate.

Source: Chemicals in cosmetics – are they safe?

Is your dish soap toxic? Here’s how to know : TreeHugger

Is your dish soap toxic? Here’s how to know : TreeHugger

A very helpful list of what shouldn’t be in your soap! Why all our washes only contain four ingredients, all of which are edible! –

Specific ingredients of highest concern:

Cocamide DEA: Concerns include cancer, chronic aquatic toxicity, acute aquatic toxicity.

DMDM Hydantoin: Concerns include chemical release (formaldehyde in this case), and irritation of the skin, eyes, or lungs.

Ethanolamine: Concerns include respiratory effects, general systemic/organ effects, chronic aquatic toxicity, nervous system effects, skin irritation/allergies/damage.

Formaldehyde: Concerns include cancer, general systemic/organ effects, respiratory effects, skin irritation/allergies/damage, acute aquatic toxicity.

Sodium Borate: Concerns include developmental/endocrine/reproductive effects, skin irritation/allergies/damage, respiratory effects.

Sulfuric Acid: Concerns include cancer, respiratory effects, skin irritation/allergies/damage.

Triclosan: Concerns include chronic aquatic toxicity, acute aquatic toxicity, general ecotoxicity, developmental/endocrine/reproductive effects, cancer, immune system effects, circulatory system effects, general systemic/organ effects, nervous system effects, skin irritation/allergies/damage, digestive system effects, damage to vision. Good times!

Source: Is your dish soap toxic? Here’s how to know : TreeHugger

The unpalatable truth about ready meals | Daily Mail Online

Why we’re big about reading ingredients and getting to know the products you buy! –

CHEAP CUTS BULKED UP WITH MEAT GLUE

While luxury brands offer select cuts of beef, tender lamb and free-range chicken, basic ready meals are packed with low-grade meats and cheap offcuts. These are often bulked out in one of two ways. The first is transglutaminase, which has the stomach-churning nickname ‘meat glue’, a super-strength enzyme which bonds slabs of raw meat together into one, uniform joint. The second is collagen, a protein extracted from butchered animal carcasses, which is processed into a powder. Combined with water, this becomes bouncy and glutinous, acting just like meat.

A chicken dinner may contain just 25 per cent meat — and even this may have been bulked out with water, oil, sugar and starch. Paul Dobson, professor for business strategy and public policy at the University of East Anglia, suspects the 2013 horsemeat scandal — in which horse DNA was detected in cheap, frozen ready meals — has made customers more discerning. However, he warns: ‘The fact that consumers did not distinguish the taste of horse from beef says a lot about how far unscrupulous producers might be able to go to mislead consumers.’

AS MUCH SUGAR AS A CAN OF COLA

Luxury ready meals may boast better meat (and higher price tags) — but they’re often far from healthy. A 2015 study analysed microwave dinners from five UK supermarkets and found those labelled ‘finest’ or ‘extra special’ contained up to twice as much saturated fat, salt and sugar as ‘basics’ or ‘value’ varieties.

Source: The unpalatable truth about ready meals | Daily Mail Online

The 18 chemicals lurking in your baby wipes | Daily Mail Online

The 18 chemicals lurking in your baby wipes | Daily Mail Online

Worryingly, you’ll find the very same ingredients in skincare too – even for babies! Why reading those ingredient lists is so important… –

Baby wipes: they might have been designed for keeping babies’ bottoms clean and smooth, but in reality there are many grown up women who rely on them, too.

They’re a handy — and cheap — make-up remover, and can also be used for a freshen up when you haven’t time for a shower. No wonder that in 2016 we went through an astounding 7,969 million packs of wipes in the UK.

They may be convenient but research reveals that wipes like this are a problem because they are made from polyester, which not only pollutes seas and clogs drains if flushed down the loo, but takes hundreds of years to decompose on landfill.

Even more alarming, is a new study (shared exclusively with Femail by consumer group Which?) that shows that the wipes we’re prepared to trust on a baby’s tender skin, not to mention our own delicate complexions, are often impregnated with a cocktail of chemicals that leaves a trail behind.

When Which? inspected the contents of 14 popular brands of baby wipes, some of those it looked at contained a staggering 18 ingredients. More disturbingly, several of the wipes contained chemicals that you probably don’t want to be putting on your skin at all.

This includes a common preservative called phenoxyethanol.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4228702/The-18-chemicals-lurking-baby-wipes.html#ixzz4a3PYD364

P&G’s Pampers baby wipes include chemicals that raise concerns, claims Ohio Public Interest Research Group – Cincinnati Business Courier

P&G’s Pampers baby wipes include chemicals that raise concerns, claims Ohio Public Interest Research Group – Cincinnati Business Courier

Why reading those labels makes a difference! –

The Ohio Public Interest Research Group released a guide that urges consumers to avoid Pampers Baby Fresh Wipes because of concerns about chemicals used to make the product, but manufacturer Procter & Gamble Co. said today that the formula was changed more than three months ago.

Ohio PIRG recently checked the ingredients listed on the packaging of Pampers Baby Fresh Wipes made by Cincinnati-based P&G (NYSE: PG) and other personal care products made by different manufacturers. Those ingredients were checked against databases and peer-reviewed studies of cosmetic chemicals to develop a consumer guide listing 10 examples of popular products that raise concerns.

Labels on Pampers Baby Fresh Wipes listed several chemicals of concern, according to Ohio PIRG, including phenoxyethanol, fragrance and PEG compounds.

Source: P&G’s Pampers baby wipes include chemicals that raise concerns, claims Ohio Public Interest Research Group – Cincinnati Business Courier