Toxic Industrial Chemicals Found in 10 Types of Macaroni and Cheese Powders

Toxic Industrial Chemicals Found in 10 Types of Macaroni and Cheese Powders

Yikes! Cheese should never come in powder form… –

Laboratory testing of 10 varieties of macaroni and cheese products has revealed toxic industrial chemicals (known as phthalates) in the cheese powders of all of the tested items, according to the Coalition for Safer Food Processing & Packaging, a national alliance of leading public health and food safety groups.

In recognition of National Macaroni and Cheese Day, the coalition has issued a call to The Kraft Heinz Company—the dominant seller of boxed macaroni and cheese, with 76 percent of market share—to drive industry-wide change by eliminating any sources of phthalates (THAL-eights) that may end up in its cheese products.

Source: Toxic Industrial Chemicals Found in 10 Types of Macaroni and Cheese Powders

Many Canned Foods Still Contain Toxic Chemical | KPBS

Many Canned Foods Still Contain Toxic Chemical | KPBS

BPA is still allowed in the linings of cans, when it really should be removed from all food containers! –

A new report from the Oakland-based Center for Environmental Health (CEH) found many canned foods still contain Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that has been linked to birth defects and cancer.

The center tested more than 250 cans of food from major retailers in nine states, including California and New York. The chemical was found in the linings of nearly 40 percent of the cans tested.

Charles Margulis, CEH’s media director, said cans sold at some dollar stores were more likely to contain BPA. “Which means that people in neighborhoods where they rely on the dollar stores for a lot of their fruits and vegetables, may be getting higher exposure to BPA,” he explained. “And these are typically neighborhoods that already suffer disproportionate toxic exposures in their daily lives.”

Source: Many Canned Foods Still Contain Toxic Chemical | KPBS

Elevated Cancer Rates Linked to Environmental Quality

Elevated Cancer Rates Linked to Environmental Quality

Yet another reason to care about what goes into our environment! –

Researchers have found a link between environmental quality and cancer incidence across the U.S.

“Our study is the first we are aware of to address the impact of cumulative environmental exposures on cancer incidence,” said Dr. Jyotsna Jagai of the University of Illinois, who led the research team.

For the study, the researchers cross-referenced the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program’s state cancer profiles with the Environmental Quality Index (EQI) and determined that the average cancer rate in roughly 2,700 counties was about 451 people in every 100,000 between 2006 and 2010.

But in counties with poor environmental quality, the researchers found a 10 percent higher incidence of cancer cases—or an average of 39 more cases per 100,000 people. The higher numbers were seen in both males and females, especially prostate and breast cancer.

Source: Elevated Cancer Rates Linked to Environmental Quality

6 Dangerous Food Mistakes

Great tips for healthier and safer food –

Charring your meat

The Threat: Heterocyclic amines, or HCAs, are carcinogenic compounds created when meat is heated up. This barbecue bummer has been shown to increase the risk of breast, lung, stomach, pancreatic, and prostate cancers.

The Fix: Master the marinade. The American Institute for Cancer Research found that marinating meat can lower HCAs by as much as 99 percent. A Kansas State University study found that marinating steaks lowered HCAs by 87 percent. Rosemary marinades are particularly protective. Food Safety Consortium tests found gingerroot, rosemary, and turmeric — all high in antioxidants — curb HCAs in cooked meat, even when cooking is at high temps. (Rosemary is most protective.) Using avocado oil can help, too. The oil — rich in cholesterol-lowering monounsaturated fatty acids — has a high smoke point, reducing harmful oil oxidation.

Source: 6 Dangerous Food Mistakes

Even ‘Safe’ Pollution Levels Can Be Deadly – The New York Times

Why every bit of clean air is important! –

Just how bad is air pollution for you? A study of more than 60 million Medicare recipients has found that even pollution levels below those generally considered safe increase the risk for premature death.

Using satellite, meteorological and other data, plus data gathered from 3,805 monitoring stations maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency, researchers were able to accurately estimate daily air pollution levels nationwide. The study is in The New England Journal of Medicine.

They followed the population for a median of seven years, recording 22,567,924 deaths. They found that each increase of 10 micrograms per cubic meter in particles smaller than 2.5 microns, or PM 2.5, was associated with a 7.3 percent increased mortality, and each increase of 10 parts per billion in warm-weather ozone was linked to a 1.1 percent increase.

Source: Even ‘Safe’ Pollution Levels Can Be Deadly – The New York Times